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Fan Speak: F

Compiled/Edited by Jon D. Swartz, N3F Historian

There are many words and abbreviations of special relevance to science fiction. In addition, over the years science fiction fandom has created many new terms. A list of some of these words and abbreviations is provided here for N3F members and for any others who are interested in the history of science fiction and science fiction fandom. Additions and/or corrections are invited.

F

 

  • Faaan – A fan more interested in fandom itself than in the SF literature. See Faaanfiction.
  • FAAANFICTION – Fiction about fans, usually found in fanzines. See Fan fiction.
  • Facs. – Dealer abbreviation for facsimile, which see.
  • Facsimile – An exact copy of a collectible. Also known as a fake copy.
  • Factsheet Five – The one truly influential guide to the (mostly printed) small press, or “zine,” movement of the 1980s. It was founded in 1982 by Mike Gunderloy. Starting as a two-page dittoed newsletter, Factsheet Five grew into a massive newsprint magazine that reviewed every small publication known to Gunderloy. Gunderloy was responsible for hijacking the term “zine” from SF fandom and applying it to any small press effort, from which the current term “e-zine” later sprang. In the late 1980s, Cari Goldberg-Janice joined first as Art Director and later as co-editor. Gunderloy and Goldberg-Janice co-authored The World of Zine for Penguin Books in 1991, an anthology of some of the best zines to have appeared in Factsheet Five. Ironically, just as the book was published and large scale success seemed to be near, Gunderloy quit the magazine. R. Seth Friedman picked up the pieces and ran Factsheet Five through the 90s. Friedman has since stopped publishing, and Factsheet Five appears to be history.
  • FAFIA – Abbreviation for Forced Away From It All, i. e., involuntary GAFIA. See GAFIA.
  • Fafiate – Verb form of term FAFIA, which see.
  • Fafiation – Noun form of term FAFIA, which see.
  • Fair – A grading classification between good and poor. See Grading.
  • Fake copy – See facsimile.
  • Fakefan – A person who is no longer (or never was) interested in science fiction or fandom per se but who enjoys the company of fans and fandom’s social life. Term sometimes is used to tease fans who are not keeping up a high level of fanac.
  • Famous Fantastic Mysteries – SF/fantasy reprint magazine, published from September/October 1939 until October 1951, for a total run of 81 issues. Mary Gnaedinger was editor of this long-running pulp magazine. See Fantastic Novels.
  • Fan – Short for fanatic, a fan (plural: fans or fen) is a person who actively engages in activities related to his/her special interest. See Fanac.
  • The Fan – Nickname for The National Fantasy Fan, the official organ of The National Fantasy Fan Federation (N3F), which see.
  • Fanac – Fan activity: writing LOCs, collecting, editing/publishing a fanzine, attending SF conventions, etc.; distinguished from proac (professional activity). Also, Fanac was a Hugo-award winning fanzine (1958/Amateur Publication) edited by Terry Carr and Ron Ellik).
  • Fanartist – A fan artist.
  • Fanboys – Comic book fans who worship the heroes of mainstream comics.
  • Fan Club – Clubs of SF, comics, pulp magazine, radio/TV, and other genre fans exist all over the world, with memberships ranging from a handful to several hundred. These clubs advertise in magazines, on the Internet, and on bulletin boards at many colleges and universities.
  • Fan-con/Fan-Con – A convention run entirely by fans and /or fan clubs, as opposed to a convention run by professionals. See Pro-Con.
  • Fancy I, Fancy II – Nicknames for Fancyclopedia I and Fancyclopedia II, respectively.
  • Fancyclopedia – An encyclopedia about SF fandom. The first such publication, Jack Speer’s Fancyclopedia, appeared in 1945.
  • Fandom – The body of SF fans that usually includes those who actively take part in Fanac.
  • Fandom Directory – An ongoing publication that lists genre fans, collectors, clubs, fan publications, conventions, etc. The first edition was published in 1979.
  • Fandora’s Box – Fan column in the prozine Imagination (April 1951 to April 1956) conducted by SF fan/writer Mari Wolf, first wife of SF author Roger P. Graham (Rog Phillips). See Imagination.
  • F&SF – Abbreviation for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, a prozine that began in the autumn of 1949 as The Magazine of Fantasy. It is still being published today.
  • F&SF Review – See Delap’s F&SF Review.
  • Fan-ed/faned – The editor of a fanzine who is also usually the publisher and finances the undertaking.
  • Fanewscard – A weekly postal card fan publication, begun by Willson (Bob) Tucker in 1943. This fanzine went through several formats, policies, and editors over a five-year period for a total of 339 issues, the last in 1948. Other editors/publishers were Frank Robinson, Ed Connor, and Walt Dunkelberger.
  • Fanfare – Title of a regular feature in the SF magazine Infinity Science Fiction which reprinted items originally published in fanzines.
  • Fan-fic – Short for fan fiction, which see. Also see Faaanfiction.
  • Fan fiction – Fiction written by fans, usually amateur SF for publication in fanzines. Originally, the term referred to fiction about fans and fandom.
  • Fan Feud – An argument among fans, involving almost anything, that escalates into a major controversy involving many people and sometimes all of fandom.
  • Fan funds – Money raised to send fans from one country to another in order to attend a con, meet other fans, etc. See CUFF, TAFF, DUFF, FFANZ, GUFF, and MAFF.
  • Fanhistory – The history of fandom (also an early fanzine published by Lee Hoffman).
  • Fan hoaxes – Common in the history of fandom, fan hoaxes were easier to carry out when most communication was by mail. Mild hoaxes included the creation of nonexistent people, fake fanzines and prozines, and imaginary conventions. Cruel hoaxes included reports that certain fans had died or committed suicide. See Pseuicide.
  • Fankind – The totality of fandom (from “mankind”).
  • Fanmag/Fan mag – Short for fan magazine, an early term for fanzine.
  • Fansmanship – The art of convincing one SF fan that you are a bigger fan. [Attributed to U.K. SF fan/author Bob Shaw]
  • Fanne – Female fan. See Fem fan/Femmefan.
  • Fannish/Fannishness – Anything pertaining to fans, fandom, and the things that fans do in fandom; also, fit only for fans.
  • Fanny – Pet name for Fantasy-News.
  • Fanorama – Column by Walt Willis that appeared in the British SF magazine Nebula Science Fiction, 1952-1965. [reputedly the longest running column about fandom/fanzines ever to appear in a professional SF magazine]
  • Fan pub – Short for fan publication and fanzine publication.
  • Fan pubber – A fan publisher.
  • Fan regular – A tee-shirt size, roughly equivalent to XL.
  • The Fanscient – A SF/fantasy fanzine (13 issues published, dated from September 1947 to Spring/Summer 1951), edited by Donald B. Day, and published by the Portland Science-Fantasy Society. Its main feature was “Author, Author” which consisted of autobiographical sketches of noted authors, accompanied by photos of the authors and bibliographies of their work.
  • Fan Shack – A term for the habitation of two or more fans. See Slan Shack.
  • Fan Slants – SF fanzine edited/published by Mel Brown (Los Angeles, CA) in the 1940s.
  • Fan Speak/Fanspeak – The language of fandom. Fan speak includes contractions, neologisms, and adopted expressions with new meanings. Although spoken, it is primarily a written language and requires the printed word to express much of its playfulness.
  • Fantastic – SF digest magazine that debuted as a “slick” magazine in the Summer of 1952. At various times during its history it was known as Fantastic Science Fiction, Fantastic Science Fiction Stories, Fantastic Stories of Imagination, Fantastic Science Fiction & Fantasy Stories, and Fantastic Sword & Sorcery and Fantasy Stories. The last issue was October 1980, at which time it was merged with Amazing (beginning with the November 1980 issue of that publication). See Amazing.
  • Fantastic Adventures – A companion publication to Amazing Stories, the pulp magazine FA was published from May 1939 (Volume 1, Number 1) until March 1953 (Volume 15, Number 3), for a total of 129 issues. Raymond A. Palmer was the first managing editor.
  • Fantastic Novels – A companion to Famous Fantastic Mysteries, this pulp magazine published novel-length SF/fantasy stories. It was published from July 1940 until April 1951, for a total run of 25 issues. Mary Gnaedinger was editor. See Famous Fantastic Mysteries.
  • Fantasy – A genre of fiction devoted to the imaginary. SF is generally considered to be a sub-genre of fantasy fiction.
  • Fantasy Fan, The – Early SF fanzine, published by Charles D. Hornig and devoted to weird fiction. The fanzine was published for 18 issues (September 1934 to February 1935).
  • Fantasy Foundation – Project originated in the early 1940s by Forrest J Ackerman to establish a permanent home for a great collection of fantasy stories and related items. This collection was to be for the benefit of all fans.
  • Fantasy Magazine – See Science Fiction Digest.
  • The Fantasy Showcase Tarot Deck – Described in the fannish literature as being inspired, compiled, and edited (1969-1980) by Bruce Pelz.
  • Fantasy Times – Winner of the first Hugo Award for an amateur publication, winning the award in 1955. This important fanzine, edited by James V. Taurasi & Ray van Houten, was later titled Science Fiction Times, which see.
  • Fanthology – A combination fanzine and anthology.
  • Fantome – A combination fanzine and book (fanzine + tome) created by Edward C. Connor in order to qualify his fanzine, S. F. Echo, for book rate shipping. The fantome consisted of mimeographed pages, cut and bound into a book-like format.
  • Fantopia – A fannish utopia.
  • Fanvariety Enterprises – A group of affiliated publishers started in 1952. A large number of well-known publishing fans were included.
  • Fanvet – A fan who is also a veteran of the armed services.
  • Fan wampum – A fannish substitute for money, invented in 1948 by Stan Woolston as a new form of currency to fit the peculiar needs of fans.
  • Fanzine – A fan magazine. “Most fanzines exist to generate egoboo” (which see).
  • Fanzine Clearing House – Program begun by SF fan Seth Johnson to collect and distribute surplus fanzines in bundles, especially to neofans.
  • Fanzine Day – February 12th, honoring the birthday of Louis Russell Chauvenet, editor of the amateur publication Detours, who coined the term fanzine in 1940.
  • Fanzine Foundation – A plan for maintaining a permanent collection of fanzines for preservation and research
  • Fanzinographic – Fannish term for “bibliographic”.
  • FAPA – Acronym for Fantasy Amateur Press Association, the first recorded apa in SF, founded in 1937 by Donald A. Wollheim. See Fap.
  • Fap – A member of a fantasy amateur press association. See FAPA.
  • FAQ/faq – Short for Frequently Asked Questions.
  • Fassbinder – Nickname/pseudonym for SF fan T. Bruce Yerke.
  • Faunch – A vague indeterminate yearning or tendency, sometimes the physical activity resulting therefrom; also, a nervous or impatient person (e. g., someone waiting for something to happen).
  • Faunching backwards – An extreme form of faunching. See Faunch.
  • Fawcett Collectors of America – Originally a comic book fanzine, edited by P. C. Hamerlinck, and dedicated to Fawcett comic books, their writers and artists. Later, a section in the Alter Ego magazine published by TwoMorrows.
  • FCA – Abbreviation for the Fawcett Collectors of America, which see.
  • Feast-gear – Tableware brought to an event by a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism. See Event. See Society for Creative Anachronism.
  • Feghoots – Elaborate puns, name taken from a character (Captain Ferdinand Feghoot) created by Grendel Briarton (pseudonym of SF author/editor Reginald Bretnor).
  • Fem fan/Femmefan – Female fan. Once rare in SF fandom, fem fans now are commonplace.
  • Feminist SF – Science fiction stories that deal with so-called “women’s issues” such as gender roles, the place of women in society, behavior between the sexes, etc.
  • Fen – Plural of fan, which see.
  • Fennes – A written term for indicating female fans, i. e., fem fans.
  • FF – Another abbreviation for fan fiction, which see.
  • FFANZ – Fan fund intended to bring the fandoms of Australia and New Zealand closer together. FFANZ was founded in 1983 by John Newman and Sue Dickie.
  • F-5 -Abbreviation for the publication Factsheet Five, which see.
  • FGoH – Fan Guest of Honor. Some conventions have a FGoH.
  • FIAWOL – Acronym for Fandom Is A Way Of Life, a slogan of those heavily involved in fanac. See FIJAGDH.
  • Fido – Nickname for the Futurian War Digest, an English SF fanzine edited by J. Michael Rosenblum during 1940-1945.
  • Fifth Fandom – The historical stage of SF fandom from 1947-1949.
  • FIJAGDH – See FIJAGH.
  • FIJAGH – Acronym for Fandom Is Just A God-Damned Hobby, the slogan attributed to fans who say they only read SF for fun and aren’t interested in fandom. See FIAWOL.
  • FIJAWOL – See FIAWOL.
  • File: 770 – SF fanzine edited/published by Mike Glyer. Winner of several Hugo Awards for best fanzine, most recently in 2001. Named after a famous party in Room 770 of the St. Charles Hotel during Nolacon I (9th Worldcon). See 770. See Worldcon.
  • Filk – The music of science fiction, often performed by fans at conventions (see Filker).
  • Filk-con – A convention of filkers, which see.
  • Filker – A person who composes and/or performs filk, the music of SF.
  • Filk Sing/Filk-sing – A gathering of fans at which filk songs are performed.
  • Filksinging – The singing of filk songs, a tradition at many conventions.
  • Filk song/Filksong – A fannish song, usually a parody.
  • Filk-tapes/filk tapes – Audio cassettes of recorded filk songs, performed by filk singers, and usually available for sale in dealers’ rooms at cons.
  • Filkzine – A fanzine devoted to filk.
  • Filler – Words put in to fill up empty space, especially by an editor on a page of a fanzine. One of the art forms of fandom.
  • Fillos – A combination of filler and illo. See Illos.
  • Film clips – See Clipper.
  • Filthy pro – Name given to fans who turn professional, but not always meant as an insult.
  • Fine – A grading classification between mint and good. See Grading.
  • First Fandom – An organization of science fiction fans, founded in 1958, who have been active in SF fandom since 1939 (member), or who can demonstrate fanac for a duration of at least 30 years (associate member). At each year’s Worldcons First Fandom presents its Hall of Fame, Posthumous Hall of Fame, and Sam Moskowitz Achievement Awards. The term “First Fandom” also refers to the first stage of historical SF fandom (1933-1936).
  • FISTFA – Abbreviation for the Fannish Insurgent Scientifictional Association.
  • Fix-up novel – A book made up of previously published stories, usually with new material added, that are “fitted together” to make a novel-length story. An example is Clifford D. Simak’s award-winning City that was published originally as eight separate stories in two different SF magazines. A. E. van Vogt is credited with originating the term.
  • FJA – Initials of American SF personality Forrest J Ackerman. Other nicknames/pseudonyms Ackerman has used are Ackermonster, Dr. Acula, Fojak, Forijay, Forjak, 4e, 4sj, Mr. SF, Jack Erman, Claire Voyant, Weaver Wright, Garrett P. Serviss, Aime Merritt, and many others. Use of initials, nicknames, and contractions of names is widespread in SF fandom. See ATom, Bjohn, MZB, SaM, WAW.
  • Flake – Subtitled “the Magazine of Cereal Box Collecting,” this fanzine was published by Boston-based collector Scott Bruce from 1989 through 1998. Twenty issues were published of the odd little publication that Newsweek once praised as “a real journalistic gem” and counted Jerry Seinfeld as a subscriber.
  • Flaking – The condition of old, brittle books, comic books, paperbacks, and pulp magazines in which small pieces of the edges of the pages chip off.
  • Flange – A generic term for anything a fan can’t remember the name of. A thingie or a watchamacallit.
  • Flash Gordon – The archetypal science fantasy hero, created by Alex Raymond in a comic strip in 1934. Flash Gordon operated in a magical universe, as opposed to the SF hero Buck Rogers, who operated in a technological universe. See Buck Rogers.
  • FLEAC – Short for Fandom’s Leading Expert And Critic, attributed to Walt Willis.
  • Flying Saucer – See UFO.
  • FMWBAWOF – Abbreviation for the motto Fandom May Well Be A Way Of Life. See FIAWOL, FIJAGDH.
  • FMZ/Fmz/fmz – An early, largely unsuccessful, abbreviation for fan magazine that is still used by some. See Fanmag.
  • Foobang – A nonsense word having many variations in spelling: foonbang, fnoobang, fnoobag, gnabnoof, etc.
  • FooFoo – Oldest of the fannish Ghods, also known as Foo. See Ghods.
  • Foogey – A word jumble. Also foogie.
  • Foogie – See Foogey.
  • Forecasts – Personal magazine of Hugo Gernsback, published at the end of the year in a 32 page, digest-sized format. In this magazine Gernsback gave his predictions for the coming year. Frank R. Paul and other noted artists provided illustrations.
  • Fornchy – Fan term meaning raunchy.
  • Forry Award – Presented by the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society for lifetime achievement in SF, fantasy, or horror, it is named for longtime SF personality Forrest J Ackerman.
  • Fortean phenomena – Inexplicable events such as mysterious disappearances, flying saucers, etc. Named after Charles Fort (1874-1932), American journalist who culled reports of mysterious events from newspapers, magazines, and scientific journals and later published them in book form.
  • Fossils, The – Organized members of the “First Fandom” of amateur publishing. Their official organ is The Fossil.
  • FotR – Abbreviation for Fellowship of the Ring, a club for fans of writer J. R. R. Tolkien.
  • Four color/four-color printing – Comic books printed in full color, using the basic four inks–red, yellow, blue, and black–in various combinations and strengths.
  • Four Horsemen of the Fannish Apocolypse, The – Avarice, Feud, Cynicism, and Idiocy. Over the years various fans have been given these titles.
  • Fourth Fandom – Period of SF fandom from 1945-1947.
  • Fout – An exclamation of surprise, disgust, and/or annoyance. “Hot Fout” is the superlative form. See Fouty.
  • Fouty – Miserable or no good.
  • Frank Hays Disease – A sudden attack of amnesia in which a filker forgets the lyrics to a filksong. Named for West Coast filker Frank Hays.
  • Frank R. Paul Award – Award named to honor the late SF artist Frank Rudolph Paul (1884-1963), Austrian-born illustrator who was the GoH at the first World SF Convention in 1939. SF artists Paul Lehr, Alex Schomburg,Vincent Di Fate, and Ron Walotsky all have won the award.
  • Freaking the mundanes – Deliberately behaving in an outrageous manner at a con in order to upset the non-SF guests at the hotel.
  • FreFanZine – An apa devoted to libertarian/anarchist politics.
  • Friends of First Fandom – New category of membership in First Fandom, begun in 2002.
  • FS – Short for Fortean Society.
  • Furry Fandom – A fan group that enjoys watching cartoons of anthropomorphic animals.
  • Franson Award – Formerly called The President’s Award, this N3F award was renamed in honor of Donald Franson (1916-2003). The award began as a means for club presidents to show appreciation for the work of members who may have won the club’s Kaymar Award, which can only be won once. See Kaymar Award.
  • Frapping – Fanspeak for “blasted” (attributed to Bjo Trimble).
  • Frappling – The fannish practice of putting strawberry jam into someone’s shoes.
  • Freebies – The items given away at conventions (books, magazines, buttons, posters, bumper stickers, flyers, etc.), often displayed on a Freebie Table. Also, copies of fanzines sent out as payment (in lieu of money) to contributors by fanzine editors.
  • Freebie Table – See Freebies.
  • Freezine – A fanzine intended to be given away by the publisher rather than sold.
  • Fringe fan – Someone who is interested in only a small part of fandom (as opposed to a trufan, which see).
  • Furry – A devotee of anthropomorphic cartoon animals, sometimes depicted in a pornographic fashion.
  • FSS – Abbreviation for the Futurian Society of Sydney, Australia.
  • FUBAR – Abbreviation for Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition.
  • Fugghead – One who speaks before he thinks, if he thinks at all; a stupid, assinine, moronic dolt (i.e., anyone you dislike).
  • Fuggheadedness – See Fugghead.
  • Funk – A fannish term referring to an esoteric outlook on life.
  • Funnies – See Newspaper Sunday Pages.
  • Future Fiction – A pulp, later digest-sized, SF magazine that went under several titles, including Future Combined with Science Fiction, Future Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Science Fiction Stories during its first series; and Future Combined with Science Fiction Stories, Future Science Fiction Stories, Future Science Fiction, and Science Fiction Stories during its second series. A total of 65 issues were published under these various titles. Editors included Charles D. Hornig (1939-1940) and Robert A. W. Lowndes (1941-1960).
  • Futuria Fantasia – Title of Ray Bradbury’s fanzine that he published in the 19xxs after graduating from high school and attempting to become a professional author.
  • Futurian House – Name of a house in the Kensington district of Brooklyn in which several of the Futurians (Wilson, Wylie, Michel) lived in 1939. The idea for a house of Futurians who would live together and share expenses was that of Pohl and his financee Doris Baumgardt who planned to marry and move in with the others, but never did.
  • Futurians – Initially formed in 1938 as the Futurian Science-Literary Society, the Futurian Federation of the Worlds was created in 1939 and known more generally as the New York Futurians or simply Futurians. The group is famous today because of the many later SF professionals who were members, among them Isaac Asimov, James Blish, Hannes Bok, Virginia Kidd, Damon Knight, Cyril Kornbluth, David Kyle, Robert Lowndes, Judith Merril, John Michel, Frederik Pohl, Richard Wilson, and Donald Wollheim.
  • FVA – Abbreviation for Fantasy Veterans Association.

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