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Fan Speak: D – E

Compiled/Edited by Jon D. Swartz, N3F Historian

There are many words and abbreviations of special relevance to science fiction. In addition, over the years science fiction fandom has created many new terms. A list of some of these words and abbreviations is provided here for N3F members and for any others who are interested in the history of science fiction and science fiction fandom. Additions and/or corrections are invited.

D

  • DAAPA – An APA based in the city of Dallas, Texas. See APA.
  • DAGR – Abbreviation for the Dragon Alliance of Gamers and Role-Players. See Dragon*Con.
  • D’Apa – An APA based in the city of Denver, Colorado. See APA.
  • Dark fantasy – A sub-genre of fantasy containing Gothic or horror elements, often involving magic used for evil.
  • Dasa Award – Presented by the German SF magazine, Dasa, for the best SF and fantasy novels of the year.
  • Daugherty project – A fannish project so grandiose that it is unlikely to ever happen. Named for 1940s Los Angeles fan, Walter Daugherty, who was known for his complicated fannish plans that rarely came to pass.
  • Davis Readers Awards – Awards in several categories given annually since 1987 by Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Magazine (formerly Astounding SF) and Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine (both published by Davis Publications) by means of polls of the magazines’ readers. After the magazines were sold to Dell Publications in 1992, the awards were renamed the Dell Readers Awards.
  • Davodd – Fan name of SF actifan David Speakman.
  • DAW/daw – Short for SF personality Donald A. Wollheim. Another nickname for Wollheim during his fan years was “the W.” Wollheim also wrote under several pseudonyms over the years: Arthur Cooke, Verne Gordon, Braxton Wells, Graham Conway, and Lawrence Woods, but most frequently as David Grinnell and Martin Pearson.
  • DAW Books – The SF/fantasy imprint started in 1972 by Donald A. Wollheim after he left his editorship at Ace Books.
  • Dawn Patrol, The – An international organization of science fiction, aviation, and aeronautics enthusiasts founded in 1998 by Roger “Pinky” Tener. Each weekday morning Tener publishes the email newsletter The Chronicles of the Dawn Patrol.
  • Day, Donald B. – SF fan who was active in local and national affairs beginning in 1946, and was Chairman of the 8th Worldcon (Norwescon) in Portland in 1950. For three years he edited The Fanscient. Day’s Perri Press, which was founded for publication of his Index to the Science Fiction Magazines, 1926-1950, but became established as a spare-time offset and letter-press printing shop of five presses, with a regular business location and a partner.
  • Daydex – Term used in SF fandom to refer to Donald B. Day’s reference work, Index to the Science Fiction Magazines, 1926-1950.
  • Deadwood – A member of an APA who publishes only the bare minimum to maintain membership.
  • Dealer – A person who sells merchandise at conventions (usually books, magazines, art prints, sculpture, jewelry, buttons, memorabilia, and other genre-related items). Also known as a Huckster or Huxter.
  • Dealers’ Room – Name given to the area at a convention where dealers sell their merchandise.
  • Dealers’ Row – Assigned rooms on a floor of a hotel at a con where dealers can sell their wares. These rooms are set up with the approval of the con and the hotel when all the space in the official dealers’ room has been taken.
  • Defect – An obvious flaw in any collectible. A defect can significantly lower the value of a collectible.
  • Degafiate – To resume fanac after gafiation.
  • Delap’s F&SF Review – Edited by Richard Delap (and sub-titled “A Review Journal of Fantasy and Science Fiction”), Delap’s F&SF Review was a fanzine that later developed into a magazine, and was published from April 1975 to March-April 1978. It was dedicated to compact but thorough reviews of all SF/fantasy published.
  • Dell Dimers – See Dimers.
  • Dell Readers Awards – See Davis Readers Awards.
  • Dentention – The 1959 Worldcon, held in Detroit, Michigan. Poul Anderson was GoH; John Berry was fan GoH; Isaac Asimov and Robert Bloch were toastmasters; Roger Sims and Fred Prophet were Con Chairs.
  • Denvention – The third Worldcon, held in Denver, Colorado in 1941. Robert A. Heinlein was GoH; Olin F. Wiggins was Con Chair.
  • Denvention Two – The 1981 Worldcon, held in Denver, Colorado. Clifford D. Simak and C. L. Moore were Guests of Honor; Rusty Hevelin was fan GoH; Ed Bryant was toastmaster; Suzanne Carnival and Don C. Thompson were Con Chairs.
  • Detention –  The 1959 Worldcon, held in Detroit, MI. Poul Anderson was GoH; Isaac Asimov and Robert Bloch were toastmasters.
  • Dianetics – The “science of mental health” created by pulp writer L. Ron Hubbard. This first SF psychotherapy was introduced in an article that appeared in the May 1950 issue of Astounding. Dianetics was the foundation for Hubbard’s Scientology, the first SF religion.
  • Dickheads – Fans of the work of author Philip K. Dick.
  • Dickian – Adjective form of the name of author Philip K. Dick.
  • Digest – A magazine of approximately 5.5 by 7.5 inches. Astounding Science Fiction was changed from pulp size to digest size with the November, 1943, issue. Some SF digests were “pulps,” while others were “slicks” (or some combination of the two).
  • Dikini – Nickname for SF fan Dick Eney.
  • Dimers – Name given by collectors to the rare Dell “ten-cents books,” launched in 1951 by Dell Publishing Company. A total of 36 titles of these thin (only 64 pages), staple bound volumes appeared. Of interest to SF fans/collectors is the last book in the series, Robert Heinlein’s Universe, with Robert Stanley cover art (his first published SF art).
  • Dinah – Nickname for the British fanzine Dawn Shadows, published by SF fan James Rathbone in the early 1940s.
  • Dinosaurs of Science Fiction – Title by which members of First Fandom refer to themselves. The official publication of the organization is Scientifiction: The First Fandom Report, currently edited by Joseph P. Martino. Jon D. Swartz is Special Features Editor.
  • Dirty Old Pro – Affectionate nickname given by fans to some professionals.
  • DisCon – The 1963 Worldcon, held in Washington, D. C. Murray Leinster was GoH; Isaac Asimov was toastmaster; George Scithers was Con Chair.
  • DisCon II – The 1974 Worldcon, held in Washington, D. C. Roger Zelazny was GoH; Jay Kay Klein was fan GoH; Andrew J. Offut was toastmaster; Jay and Alice Haldeman were Con Chairs.
  • Disty – An issue or mailing of an amateur press association (APA); short for distribution. Used frequently in e-zines.
  • Ditmar Award – The Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Achievement Award, known as the Ditmar, is given in several categories each year at the Australian National SF Convention.
  • Ditto – Short for dittograph, a spirit duplicating process using a spirit master and a fluid. Also, a convention for editors/publishers of fanzines that began in Toronto in 1988 as a one-shot convention. It became a repeating event held in the fall of each year in various cities. Ditto 16 was held in Eugene, Oregon in 2003.
  • Dittozine – Fanzine produced by ditto, which see.
  • The Diversifier – Popular SF fanzine of the 1970s, published from 1974 to 1979 for 20+ issues.
  • Dixie Fan – A fan from the South.
  • DJ/dj – Short for dust jacket, which see.
  • D’J – Short for the fanzine D’Journal, which see.
  • D’Journal – Early SF fanzine of Wilson (Bob) Tucker, first published in the Spring of 1935.
  • DNP – Abbreviation for Do Not Print. See DNQ.
  • DNQ – Abbreviation for Do Not Quote, a postscript sometimes added to a LOC (which see), indicating that the author of the letter does not wish to be quoted. See DNP.
  • Doctored – Dealer’s term for a repaired or rebuilt book, usually used in a negative fashion (as in “an undoctored copy” of this rare book).
  • Doctor Who Bulletin – A media fanzine published in the 1980s-1990s. Originally devoted to the Doctor Who series, it eventually widened its scope to cover other SF films and TV.
  • Doë – Pronounced Dough-ee. See Perri, Leslie.
  • Doorknob – A person with about as much personality as one.
  • Dork – Short for a doorknob, which see.
  • DoS – Abbreviation for the SF fanzine Don-o-Saur, published in the 1970s by Don C. Thompson.
  • DOT – Short for Derelicts of Toronto.
  • Double Bill – Popular SF fanzine published by two fans named Bill: Bill Bowers and Bill Malardi. Volume 1, Number 1 was dated October 1962.
  • The Double: Bill Symposium – A 110 page one-shot fanzine, edited by Bill Bowers and Bill Malardi (D&B Press, Akron, Ohio), and published in 1969. It consists of 94 replies to a questionnaire for pro SF writers/editors. The questionnaire was created by Lloyd Biggle, Jr.
  • Double-fans/double fans – Fans active in two fandoms, such as Comic Fandom and SF Fandom. See Multi-fans.
  • Douglas Adams Award – Annual award given for innovative comedy writing on BBC Radio, first presented in 2001. The award is named for the British writer Douglas Adams (1952-2001) who wrote the popular radio series The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (originally broadcast in 1978) that resulted in a novelization of the satirically humorous work by the same title in 1979.
  • DM – Short for Dungeonmaster, which see.
  • Dragon*Con – Annual convention that originated in 1987 as an outgrowth of a SF and gaming group, the Dragon Alliance of Gamers and Role-Players (DAGR). The International Horror Guild Annual Awards are presented at the Dragon*Cons.
  • Drobe – An uncomplimentary term for an attendee of a SF con, often in costume, who wanders around the venue without interacting with other fans or otherwise participating in con activities.
  • D.S.C.R. – Abbreviation for the Doc Savage Club Reader, a fanzine published in the late 1970s-early 1980s.
  • DSFL – Short for Detroit Science-Fantasy League.
  • DUFF – The Down Under Fan Fund, a cultural exchange program, in alternate years sends an Australian SF fan to North America and a North American fan to Australia.
  • Dum-Dums – Annual conventions of The Burroughs Bibliophiles. The term is borrowed from the Tarzan books, where it was used to describe the trial revelries of the great apes as they danced by the light of the moon.
  • Dungeons and Dragons – First of the standardized role-playing games, devised by Gary Gygax in 1974. The game involves creating a character and taking that character through a series of adventures with other characters developed by other players. Much of the action takes place in the minds of the players, led by a Dungeonmaster (which see).
  • Dungeonmaster – The leader of a game of Dungeons and Dragons, also called the DM. The DM is in charge of a Dungeons and Dragons adventure, and can create whatever is needed to keep things going.
  • Duper/Dupper – A duplicating machine, such as a mimeograph or hektograph.
  • Dust jacket – A paper cover that protects a book, usually with cover art in addition to the title of the book and the author’s name.
  • DW/dw – Short for Dust Wrapper. See Dust jacket.
  • DW³ – Collectively the three Futurians Don Wollheim, Dirk Wylie, and Dick Wilson.
  • DWB – Abbreviation for the Doctor Who Bulletin, which see.
  • Dystopia – A negative utopia.

E

  • Eastern Massachusetts Fantasy Society – See The Nameless Ones.
  • Edgar Awards – The Edgars (Edgar Allen Poe Awards), also known as the American Mystery Writers Awards, are given annually by the Mystery Writers Association of America (MWA). SF authors have won several of these awards.
  • Edgar Allen Poe Award – See Edgar Awards.
  • Edward E. “Doc” Smith Award – Given by NESFA at the annual Boskone convention, this award (also known as The Skylark Award and the Lensman Award), honors Smith’s Lensman series of stories. The award consists of a trophy with a large lens.
  • E. Everett Evans Award – Award founded by SF personality Forrest J. Ackerman to honor outstanding service to the SF field. It is named for SF writer Evans (1893-1958) and given to individuals not previously recognized for such contributions. Also known as the Big Heart Award.
  • 11th Worldcon – The 1953 World SF Convention, held in Philadelphia, PA. Willy Ley was GoH; Isaac Asimov was toastmaster; Milton Rothman was Con Chair.
  • Empire for the SF Writer – Founded in 1974 “to assist, inform, and entertain the science fiction writer,” Empire SF specialized in material for aspiring writers. It was published by Kevin O’Donnell, Jr., and edited first by Mark J. McGarry and then by Mary Kittredge.
  • The Enchanted Duplicator – Famous SF fan epic written by Walt Willis and Bob Shaw in 1954 that follows the adventures of Jophan as he travels from the land of Mundane to the land of Trufandom in search of the Magic Mimeograph with which to publish the perfect fanzine. Along the way he overcomes the Circle of Lassitude and other pitfalls. See Circle of Lassitude.
  • Endeavour Award – Presented at the annual OryCon to honor a science fiction or fantasy novel or a single-author collection created by a Pacific Northwest writer. The award is named for the ship of the Northwest explorer Captain James Cook. The first winner was Greg Bear’s Dinosaur in 1999.
  • Eney’s Fault – An earth fracture underlying Arlington, Virginia.
  • Eofan – Early term used to denote SF fans who were active during the 1930-1933 period, and whose activities may extend into the present.
  • Eofandom – See Eofan.
  • EGLMSFCMS – Abbreviation for the Elves’, Gnomes’ and Little Men’s Science Fiction, Chowder and Marching Society. See Invisible Little Man Award.
  • Egoboo/ego-boo – Praise for fannish accomplishment, short for ego boost/ego boosting.
  • Egobuck – An award given by the LASFS for services to the club. See LASFS.
  • Egoscan/egoscan/ego-scan – Quickly reading a fanzine to see if one’s own name is mentioned. See Egoscanning.
  • Egoscanning – In apas, the process of looking through the mailing of comments to oneself before settling down to read the rest of the comments.
  • Eisner Awards – See Will Eisner Awards.
  • Eld – Short for Elders.
  • Elder Gods – Background deities in stories by H. P. Lovecraft and Richard S. Shaver.
  • Energumen – Hugo award-winning SF fanzine (1972), edited by Michael and Susan Glicksohn).
  • Engram – A mental block causing confusion in the individual having it (from Dianetics, which see).
  • Ephless El – SF fan Elmer Perdue, who lacked the F key on his typer.
  • Epic – In fannish circles, an epic is any classic and/or well-received work or series of works (e. g., Tucker’s The Neo-Fan’s Guide to Science Fiction Fandom).
  • E-Publishing/e-publishing – Short for Electronic publishing.
  • ERB – Initials of genre author Edgar Rice Burroughs, by which he is often identified.
  • Erbania – British fanzine devoted to the life and works of Edgar Rice Burroughs, beginning with the first issue dated April 1956. It was published by D. P. Ogden of Blackpool, England.
  • ERB-dom – Hugo-award winning fanzine (1965/Amateur Magazine), devoted to the life and works of ERB and related topics, and edited by Camille “Caz” Cazadessus. The only Burroughs fanzine ever to win the Hugo award, at one time it assimilated the venerable Fantasy Collector.
  • ERG Quarterly – SF fanzine published for 30+ years by British fan Terry Jeeves.
  • ESFA – Abbreviation for the Eastern Science Fiction Association.
  • ESFS – Abbreviation for the Eugene Science Fiction Society.
  • ESP – Abbreviation for Extra-sensory perception, one of the so-called psi powers, which see.
  • Essef – An early fannish spelling of science fiction (i. e., SF).
  • E.T. – An Extra-Terrestrial, or alien.
  • Eternity Science Fiction – Beginning as a fanzine with the first issue (first series) dated July 1972, Eternity SF became a semi-prozine with the first issue of its second series, dated November 1979. It was published for a total of six issues, all edited by its publisher Stephen Gregg, and sought to emphasize SF poetry and graphic art.
  • European Science Fiction Society – An international organization of SF professionals and fans founded in 1972 at the first Eurocon in Trieste, Italy. Eurocons are held “at least every two years,” at which time awards in a variety of categories are presented.
  • Evans-Freehafer Award – Sponsored by Walter J. Daugherty and presented each October by LASFS for unselfish service to the club in the year preceding. The first recipient was Al Lewis in 1959.
  • Event – A meeting of the Society for Creative Anachronism, which see.
  • Excerpting – Taking pages of a story (or artwork) from a magazine and binding them separately.
  • Ex-fan – One who walks out of fandom, either quietly (in which case s/he is seldom missed) or loudly (denouncing those who remain behind, and sometimes blaming them for all his/her troubles).
  • Ex. Lib. – Short for ex libris, the term refers to a former library copy of a book. Usually such books are seen by collectors as reading or filler copies.
  • Ex libris – See Ex. Lib.
  • Exonumia – Dealer’s term for coin-like collectibles such as medals, tokens, badges, ribbons, etc. Premiums from SF radio and TV programs often are included in the stock of such dealers.
  • Exonumist – A collector or dealer in exonumia, which see.
  • Eyetracks – Marks left on the printed page by careless reading habits.
  • E-zine/e-zine – Short for electronic fanzine, i. e., a fanzine distributed via e-mail or by the World Wide Web.

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